Earth Day Zero Waste

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Earth day is this week, but you can celebrate every day! One way you can do your part to reduce waste is by embracing reusable alternatives when you’re eating at a restaurant or anywhere on the go. Here are a few simple items you can thrift at your local Goodwill to help you be prepared!

Reusable Bag:
The perfect way to keep your kit together, great for runs to the store, useful for transporting food – skip the flimsy plastic!

Cloth Napkin:
Pass on the paper and go for a cloth option. Practical, washable, durable – just throw a few in your kit!

Metal Straws:
Make plastic straws a thing of the past by keeping a few of these on hand, plus you’ll never have to contend with the occasional dreaded punctured straw…

Reusable Drinkware/Travel Mug:
Keep your drinks warmer/colder longer and avoid disposable drinkware.

Divided Container:
Great for bringing lunches or taking leftovers home. Skip the Styrofoam and plastic to-go boxes!

Silverware:
Handy for avoiding disposable plastic alternatives, easy to clean – keep a few sets on hand so you can wash and rotate.

Glass Jar:
A great small container option for snacks or drinks.

Small Containers:
Have a few for dry snacks or smaller to-go items – flexible, convenient, a must in any kit.

Preparing your own zero waste kit is a fun challenge that will help you avoid unnecessary trash and single use items in your daily routine. Create your own, and share any new ideas you discover by tagging us on social media: Marion Goodwill.

 

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Goodwill Wheel-A-Thon Celebrates 28th Anniversary of Promoting Disability Awareness

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Looking for a hands-on opportunity to promote disability awareness? Marion Goodwill’s 28th Annual Wheel-A-Thon is Saturday, May 19 at the Tri-Rivers Career Center located at 2222 Marion-Mt. Gilead Road. For 28 years now, the event has welcomed all members of the community to show their support for Goodwill and their mission to assist individuals with disabilities and other barriers find employment. The Wheel-A-Thon features a wheelchair relay race, 50/50 raffle, auction of donated items from notable community patrons, and spaghetti dinner from the Warehouse.

Events for the Wheel-A-Thon kick off at 9:30 a.m. with team registration. The wheelchair races begin at 10:00 a.m. and continue until one team is declared the big winner. The wheelchair race is a fun learning experience as three-person teams from various businesses, organizations, and schools discover how difficult it is to maneuver a wheelchair and make it move the way you want.

Throughout the event, racers and spectators can enjoy the auction and 50/50 raffle, both additional fundraisers for Goodwill. The grand finale will be the auction featuring items donated from local businesses. This year promises to deliver some intense bidding as there will be a small appliance package from Whirlpool, ladies diamond earrings from Carroll’s Jewelers, a 3-night trip to Savannah, Georgia provided by I Heart Media – Marion, an OSU quilt from Stitch ‘n Fix, and gift certificates from local restaurants and much more!

The spaghetti dinner sponsored by The Warehouse will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Wheelchair owners will want to take advantage of the Wheelchair Round-Up offered by Marion Area Physical Therapy, who will once again be providing their services from 9:00 a.m. to noon. The Wheelchair Round-Up features a mobility station to make minor repairs and consultations to wheelchairs, free of charge. Each chair will receive a “tune-up”, which includes a power wash, complete inspection, and repairs.

Goodwill will also be accepting wheelchair donations on behalf of Wheels for the World, an internationally recognized organization, which collects and distributes wheelchairs to disabled individuals in need. If you would like to donate a gently used wheelchair, you can bring them to the Wheel-A-Thon or to a Goodwill store near you.

For additional information about the event, including how you or your business can form a team for the races, sponsor a team, or donate an auction item, contact Kathy Wink at (740) 223-3114. Again, the event is open to the public, no RSVP necessary for spectators.

Goodwill is Your Place to Make the Holidays Special

 

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Good finds and good gifts at Goodwill this holiday season

 

There’s no need to rush around town this holiday season trying to find gifts for everyone on your shopping list. That’s because Goodwill has everything you need to make the season something special — from good finds to good gifts and good times — all in one place. Goodwill is a great option whether you’re looking for top-notch, inexpensive gift ideas or for items you can use in making personalized, do-it-yourself gifts.

 

“When you buy holiday gifts and supplies from Goodwill, you’re actually giving twice,” said Bob Jordan, President & CEO of Marion Goodwill Industries. In addition to finding a wide variety of gifts, you can also feel good about helping to build brighter futures for people in Marion, Delaware, Union, Crawford and Morrow counties.”

 

By shopping at and donating to Goodwill, you help provide job placement and training opportunities for members of the community. Goodwill provides job preparation, skills training, education assistance and support services, not only here but also to millions of people each year who are facing challenges to finding employment.

 

For those who like to create their own holiday gifts, Goodwill can provide a treasure trove of usable goods — from vintage glassware, linens and utensils to our wide variety of holiday sweaters to all sorts of baskets, containers and bags.

 

In addition to finding great gifts when you shop at Goodwill, you can also reduce waste by giving used items a second life. When you consider the holidays are all about giving, shopping at one of our nine retail locations at Goodwill, you can make the season extra special this year!

 

Meet Jane…

By: Nicole Workman, Director of Communication, Marion Co. Board of Developmental Disabilities

JaneJane Honea-Krajewski may be deaf and non-speaking, but she is not silent. She has a strong, determined personality that draws people to her.

These character traits, along with a little help from the Marion County Board of Developmental Disabilities (MCBDD) and Opportunities for Ohioans (OOD) with Disabilities, landed her a job at Marion Goodwill.

It all started with a referral from Turning Point when Jane went to them seeking resources and help. Turning Point knew exactly how to guide Jane and led her to MCBDD and OOD. Since Jane is deaf and non-speaking, OOD enlisted an interpreter to help Jane with her aspirations of employment in the community. Elisabeth Clegg, sign language interpreter with Hallenross and Associates, LLC helped be Jane’s voice and ears.

“It has been a great experience being Jane’s interpreter all this time and getting to see her achieve her goals. I am glad I could be a part of the team and provide her with the communication access she needed to get where she wanted to be,” Clegg said. “I am very thankful that each place Jane came into contact with was so willing to respect her rights and provide interpreters for her,” she added.

Together, Elisabeth and Jane worked with the Employment Services team at MCBDD to do a job assessment and learn about Jane’s skills, likes, and interests. Once assessed, Jane began the process of resume writing, application submissions, and follow-up with MCBDD Job Developer, Ken Padgett. The three of them worked side by side through the process and had a great time doing it.

“The three of us made a great team. Jane had a positive attitude and was determined while Elisabeth was a godsend to make communications easy,” Pagdett said.

Jane agreed that the three of them worked very well together to find her employment.
“I had a lot of obstacles to work around and some health issues during the process, but we all powered through and in the end I have found a job that I love,” Jane said.

Jane went on to say that Ken and Elisabeth were both extremely helpful and easy to work with. She said that she filled out close to 20 applications. The three of them went out to the businesses where Jane applied to see if they could speak to a manager about her application. When they went to Goodwill, the stars aligned and Jane was granted an interview on the spot.

Sharri Moose, Jane’s supervisor at Goodwill said of the on-the-spot-interview, “God gave us a blessing of having all of the right people together to be able to talk to Jane right then and there.”

Beth Whitaker, store manager, Goodwill, said it was her first time interviewing someone who was deaf but it went very well.

“Having an interpreter there to help Jane communicate was all we needed to get a feel for whether or not she would be a good fit. Turns out, she’s perfect! We love having her,” Whitaker said. She added that you sometimes just know when you have found a good fit and you don’t want them to walk out the door.

“I had this feeling with Jane that she would be good – and she is amazing. She’s one of the most detailed employees that I have and works at a very fast pace.”

Moose and Whitaker agreed that Jane has been a great fit. Goodwill’s mission is to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity, and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work.

“Jane certainly fits our mission and appears to have the same values. She is very patient with us as we learn to communicate with her. She is even teaching us some sign language,” Moose said.

The staff at Goodwill agreed that they have really enjoyed having Jane as part of their team. They said they often communicate on a white board or with pen and paper to answer questions or simply enjoy a conversation. Clegg does still come in to interpret for staff meetings and trainings to be sure Jane is getting the information she needs to continue to do her job and grow with the company.

It’s great to see employers such as Goodwill recognizing the ability in a person instead of the disability. Being opened to people who may be different resulted in a great match.
It’s exciting to see Jane flourish and grow.

Thank You!

Thank you for making our 27th annual Wheel-a-Thon a success! 

WAT Thank You MarionStar 2017

This Earth Day, Save, Shop at and Donate to Goodwill to Help People in Communities

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Goodwill’s commitment to sustainability and job creation makes for a happier planet

Every year, people clean out their closets and homes to start fresh for the spring season. This Earth Day, Marion Goodwill is encouraging people to live more sustainable lifestyles and help people in their local communities find jobs. In addition, people can shop at our Goodwill stores and save while collectively diverting more than three million pounds of items from landfills impacting environmental sustainability. By shopping at and donating to Goodwill, you can people find employment, and build their work skills.

Goodwill’s donation-resale model extends the life of clothing and other goods, and earns revenue for Goodwill job training programs, employment placement services and other important social services, such as credentials, job readiness classes, financial education, and more. Donating to Goodwill is a simple way to begin living more sustainably. Last year, college students at more than 55 colleges and universities participated in Goodwill Campus Move-Out donation programs. Students donated what they no longer needed to Goodwill before moving out of their dorms or apartments for the summer. In the process of giving these items a new life and collecting more than 1.1 million pounds of donations, the Goodwill Campus Move-Out programs collectively helped fund more than 26,000 hours of critical job training and placement services for the people in the various communities where the programs took place. Our Goodwill partnered with Ohio Wesleyan University on the move-out donation program.

“Revenue raised through the sale of donated goods creates employment opportunities and important social services to help transform someone’s life. This is all done through the simple act of cleaning out a closet,” said Bob Jordan, President, CEO of Marion Goodwill. “Making a commitment to reduce, reuse and repurpose this Earth Day is as simple as heading to the nearest Goodwill store or donation center.”

Every donation at Goodwill provides on-site training, access to computers for job search assistance, employment placement job training and other community-based services such as career counseling, financial education, industry-recognized credentials, and résumé preparation for anyone facing challenges to finding employment.

Donate Stuff. Create Jobs.

 

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For more than 22 years, Goodwill has partnered with The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc., for the Goodwill Sale, during which time hundreds of thousands of pounds of stuff have been donated to fund job training programs to put people in your community back to work.

 

Donate March 15 to April 1 at any Bon-Ton, Boston Store, Bergners, Carson’s, Elder-Beerman, Herberger’s or Younkers to receive a coupon up to 30% off at these locations, good for cosmetics, fragrance, handbags and more.  Donate Stuff. Create Jobs.

 

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It feels good to start fresh, and it feels great to make a positive difference in your community. That’s what happens when you donate to Goodwill this spring. Your stuff fuels job training programs for people in your neighborhood. You get a clean home and your neighbors get a fresh start. To find your nearest donation center go to www.mariongoodwill.org

 

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