LET YOUR RESOLUTION TURN INTO SOMEONE ELSE’S JOB SOLUTION

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By organizing your home and donating items to Goodwill, you can be a job creator!
Are you having trouble coming up with a good new year’s resolution — one that you’ll actually stick to this time? Don’t worry! Goodwill has just the incentive for starting off the New Year right, with a resolution that will help you — and your neighbors, too. By clearing out the clutter from your home and donating unwanted items to Goodwill, you can help fund job training programs and services right in your local community.

The new year is a great time to resolve to clean out unwanted items from your home. It’s also a time of year when many people set out to find new jobs or career paths. Thanks to Goodwill, many people can make good on their de-cluttering resolutions this year — and it all centers on donations.

Marion Goodwill has 9 retail locations and 2 Attended Donation Centers that accept donations of clothing and household goods. We also accept donated electronics, computers and furniture. Goodwill then sells those items in its stores, generating revenue to fund job training programs for people with barriers to employment.
In the past year, donations to Marion Goodwill allowed over 3,400 individuals access to career, family and financial services. Our Education and Training Center helped individuals find new jobs thanks to the generosity of Goodwill donors.

“Your donations to Goodwill have a direct, positive impact on the lives of people in your community,” said Kathy Wink, Marketing Director of Marion Goodwill Industries. “By donating just two bags of clothing and a working computer you no longer need, you can help fund eight hours of classes for someone searching for a job. Every donation helps.”
Visit http://www.mariongoodwill.org to find your nearest Goodwill donation center.

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Goodwill is Your Place to Make the Holidays Special

 

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Good finds and good gifts at Goodwill this holiday season

 

There’s no need to rush around town this holiday season trying to find gifts for everyone on your shopping list. That’s because Goodwill has everything you need to make the season something special — from good finds to good gifts and good times — all in one place. Goodwill is a great option whether you’re looking for top-notch, inexpensive gift ideas or for items you can use in making personalized, do-it-yourself gifts.

 

“When you buy holiday gifts and supplies from Goodwill, you’re actually giving twice,” said Bob Jordan, President & CEO of Marion Goodwill Industries. In addition to finding a wide variety of gifts, you can also feel good about helping to build brighter futures for people in Marion, Delaware, Union, Crawford and Morrow counties.”

 

By shopping at and donating to Goodwill, you help provide job placement and training opportunities for members of the community. Goodwill provides job preparation, skills training, education assistance and support services, not only here but also to millions of people each year who are facing challenges to finding employment.

 

For those who like to create their own holiday gifts, Goodwill can provide a treasure trove of usable goods — from vintage glassware, linens and utensils to our wide variety of holiday sweaters to all sorts of baskets, containers and bags.

 

In addition to finding great gifts when you shop at Goodwill, you can also reduce waste by giving used items a second life. When you consider the holidays are all about giving, shopping at one of our nine retail locations at Goodwill, you can make the season extra special this year!

 

Meet Jane…

By: Nicole Workman, Director of Communication, Marion Co. Board of Developmental Disabilities

JaneJane Honea-Krajewski may be deaf and non-speaking, but she is not silent. She has a strong, determined personality that draws people to her.

These character traits, along with a little help from the Marion County Board of Developmental Disabilities (MCBDD) and Opportunities for Ohioans (OOD) with Disabilities, landed her a job at Marion Goodwill.

It all started with a referral from Turning Point when Jane went to them seeking resources and help. Turning Point knew exactly how to guide Jane and led her to MCBDD and OOD. Since Jane is deaf and non-speaking, OOD enlisted an interpreter to help Jane with her aspirations of employment in the community. Elisabeth Clegg, sign language interpreter with Hallenross and Associates, LLC helped be Jane’s voice and ears.

“It has been a great experience being Jane’s interpreter all this time and getting to see her achieve her goals. I am glad I could be a part of the team and provide her with the communication access she needed to get where she wanted to be,” Clegg said. “I am very thankful that each place Jane came into contact with was so willing to respect her rights and provide interpreters for her,” she added.

Together, Elisabeth and Jane worked with the Employment Services team at MCBDD to do a job assessment and learn about Jane’s skills, likes, and interests. Once assessed, Jane began the process of resume writing, application submissions, and follow-up with MCBDD Job Developer, Ken Padgett. The three of them worked side by side through the process and had a great time doing it.

“The three of us made a great team. Jane had a positive attitude and was determined while Elisabeth was a godsend to make communications easy,” Pagdett said.

Jane agreed that the three of them worked very well together to find her employment.
“I had a lot of obstacles to work around and some health issues during the process, but we all powered through and in the end I have found a job that I love,” Jane said.

Jane went on to say that Ken and Elisabeth were both extremely helpful and easy to work with. She said that she filled out close to 20 applications. The three of them went out to the businesses where Jane applied to see if they could speak to a manager about her application. When they went to Goodwill, the stars aligned and Jane was granted an interview on the spot.

Sharri Moose, Jane’s supervisor at Goodwill said of the on-the-spot-interview, “God gave us a blessing of having all of the right people together to be able to talk to Jane right then and there.”

Beth Whitaker, store manager, Goodwill, said it was her first time interviewing someone who was deaf but it went very well.

“Having an interpreter there to help Jane communicate was all we needed to get a feel for whether or not she would be a good fit. Turns out, she’s perfect! We love having her,” Whitaker said. She added that you sometimes just know when you have found a good fit and you don’t want them to walk out the door.

“I had this feeling with Jane that she would be good – and she is amazing. She’s one of the most detailed employees that I have and works at a very fast pace.”

Moose and Whitaker agreed that Jane has been a great fit. Goodwill’s mission is to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity, and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work.

“Jane certainly fits our mission and appears to have the same values. She is very patient with us as we learn to communicate with her. She is even teaching us some sign language,” Moose said.

The staff at Goodwill agreed that they have really enjoyed having Jane as part of their team. They said they often communicate on a white board or with pen and paper to answer questions or simply enjoy a conversation. Clegg does still come in to interpret for staff meetings and trainings to be sure Jane is getting the information she needs to continue to do her job and grow with the company.

It’s great to see employers such as Goodwill recognizing the ability in a person instead of the disability. Being opened to people who may be different resulted in a great match.
It’s exciting to see Jane flourish and grow.

Find Good Gifts and Create Good Times at Goodwill

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Goodwill can help make the holidays special!

The holidays are a time of giving, and at Goodwill, that rings especially true! When you do your holiday shopping at your local Goodwill store, you can find great gifts while building a brighter future for someone in your community.

Savvy shoppers understand that Goodwill is the best place to purchase holiday gifts and supplies at low prices. What some may not know is that with each purchase you make, you’re reducing waste and giving used items a second life as well as creating job opportunities for people in your community.

“Goodwill is your place for good finds, good gifts and good times,” said Jim Gibbons, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries International. “With the great variety of items in Goodwill stores — from holiday knick-knacks and clothing to do-it-yourself inspiration — you can make your holidays something special with Goodwill.” 

When it comes to holiday DIY projects, Goodwill helps you go for broke without going broke! Here are a few of the many great ideas to consider as you shop at your local Goodwill store this holiday season:

·         Look for vintage glassware, utensils, serving items and linens to create a chic mix-and-match holiday tablespace.

·         Use chalkboard paint to turn a serving tray into a seriously sophisticated holiday menu board.

·         Get ready for your next seasonal sweater party, either by finding a ready-to-wear, holiday-themed pullover or by adding your own beading and holiday-themed appliques to a Goodwill sweater.

·         For the world travelers on your gift list, find and frame vintage maps of destinations visited or yet-to-be explored.

·         Create stylish and personalized kitchen organizers from baskets and canisters found at Goodwill.

Goodwill is also happy to accept donations of household items, clothing and other useful things to sell in our stores. Know that when you donate — and when you shop — at Goodwill, you’re helping someone on the path to a better job or a better life.

 

How to Age Books with Tea and Tights

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Yes, you read that title right! It turns out that it’s really easy to make thrifted tights into spooky spider webs and for tea to stain the pages of a secondhand book creating the perfect antique appearance. These two projects partnered with our tips for aging the outside of Goodwill books will give your library a complete facelift just in time for Halloween. One thing that I love about creating custom decor from Goodwill finds is that they look more authentic than the plastic props you’ll find in chain stores. The other benefit to updating thrifted purchases is that since Goodwill donations are the beginning of job creation, when you support our stores you’re helping people within your community find employment. So, without further ado, let’s jump into these projects, shall we?

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Project 1: Turning White Tights into a Spider Web

Materials
White tights or nylons
Scissors
A microplane or food grater (optional)

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This project is so incredibly easy that I don’t even think I need to write out the steps! All you need to do is use scissors and/or a microplane/kitchen grater to put runs into the tights. Then with your fingers, stretch the runs so the fabric separates into web-like threads. Keep snipping, grating, and pulling until you like the way your web looks. I found it helpful to have the books I was decorating right nearby as I made the web so I could stretch it into place as I went. Since there’s so much elasticity in tights, it’s really easy to stretch them around items so they stay in place without tape or tacks.

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Project 2: Tea-staining Book Pages

You may have tea-stained paper before, but the process of doing it for bound books is a little different because you can’t bake the pages to dry or completely cover them with tea (that would dampen the binding and make it hard to properly dry every page). Thankfully, the way that books age usually shows a darkening of the page edges while the inner portion stays lighter. This is easy to replicate with tea! Here’s how:

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Materials
A book to age
Two large stacks of books to stabilize the tea-stained book as it dries
A heat-safe dish that is longer than the height of the book
2 cups of boiling water
4 tea bags (not herbal—I used Earl Grey)
A fan
A paintbrush (optional)
A kettle

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Step 1: Put the kettle on to boil the water. While that heats, build two stacks of books with the dish between them. The stacks need to be tall enough that the book can hang from it to dry (scroll down to see the picture of drying if necessary). Set the fan up so it blows on the area between the two stacks.

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Step 2: Place the tea bags into your dish and pour the boiling water over it. Let that steep for ten minutes.

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Step 3: Carefully remove the tea bags and set aside. Open the book holding both covers in one hand so the pages hang down. Dip the long edge of the pages only (not the cover or binding) into the tea. You can dip it in several times or hold it in the tea for a few seconds. Then pull it out of the tea and hold it above the dish for a few moments to let the tea drip off.

Step 4: Turn the book upright over the container and use the paintbrush or a tea bag to brush tea onto the top edges of the pages. Start on the corner that is already tea-stained then brush softly in toward the binding so the tea stain will fade slightly as it gets closer to the spine. Avoid getting the binding and cover wet. Then turn the book again and do this same brushing technique on the bottom edges of the pages.

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Step 5: If your book is still dripping, set it up to dry by placing its front and back covers between the two stacks with the container still underneath. If it’s not dripping, feel free to move the container so the stacks can be moved closer together. Turn on the fan to help the book dry. As it dries, the tea stain will darken.

Step 6: Wait for an hour then turn the book around so the other short side of the pages is closer to the fan.

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Step 7: Wait for a half-hour while that side dries then you can remove your book from the piles and stand it upright with the pages fanned slightly to finish drying. At this point, the edges of every page should be perfectly browned just as an old book is! Each page will also gain a well-read crinkle/warp so they appear to have been leafed through again and again over the years.

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And that’s it! Your spell-binding aged books are ready for display this Halloween season. You could use these to decorate around your candy dish on All Hallows’ Eve or as a centerpiece on your October dining table. We’d love to see your creativity if you decide to try these projects yourself!

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Back to School Buys for Every Age

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Over the next few weeks, students of all ages will be returning to school. Whether you are enrolled in grad school or your little one is heading off to kindergarten, thrift shopping for your back-to-school needs is the best way to stick to a budget and prepare yourself for the year ahead.
In the world of back-to-school shopping, there are sweaters and lunch boxes, and then there are couches and foosball tables. In college, students finally have the freedom to furnish their own space. They work hard on papers and focus fastidiously during lectures, so in their downtime they deserve to relax and enjoy themselves with some slightly frivolous purchases. The big problem for college students, though, is funding: being newly independent means being suddenly (and shockingly) aware of your living expenses. That’s why Goodwill is a college student’s best friend – low prices for everything an undergrad could possibly need,

Good luck to anyone heading back to school this fall, no matter your age or grade level. May your year pass by with minimal stress and just the right amount of challenge to help you grow. You can do it!

Thank You!

Thank you for making our 27th annual Wheel-a-Thon a success! 

WAT Thank You MarionStar 2017

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